Momentum Volume 1

Is the time taken to submit business awards really worthwhile?

Managing Director: Paul Williamson, Realia Marketing

Having written several awards submissions for clients and ourselves in 2014 with all of them reaching the finals in the respective categories; I was naturally pleased with our efforts. It also led me to think about what the actual benefits of winning awards could be vs. the effort required to deliver an award winning entry.

If you search the web you’ll find lots of anecdotal evidence to support the widely held belief that awards are a good thing. Increased sales, widespread credibility, extra valuable exposure within the business community and the media – as well as boosting employee motivation – are all well documented reasons to enter and shouldn’t be taken lightly.
Whilst I have yet to find hard evidence that awards win business, there’s no doubt in my mind that it does help the sales process by providing 3rd party credibility – our nominations have certainly helped us in that regard.
Internally, award wins do provide a real boost in motivation. We’ve witnessed this first hand, having created employee awards for a couple of clients – as well as the pride employees feel in working for an award-winning organisation – shouldn’t be underestimated. Award success also has a huge impact on the relationship with your existing clients. Clients want to know that they’re working with a great business, one that’s investing in its own future and has enough belief in its abilities to enter awards. It’s fair to say that the clients who attended our awards events this year, walked (in some cases stumbled!) away from the event with a renewed confidence in our capabilities, a sense of pride of what has been achieved and a renewed investment in a joint determination to succeed again next year.

The big issue is, of course, time, resource, content and an ability to write.

Writing an award is a time intensive exercise – not just the writing itself, but digging out the actual content from multiple sources. The skills involved in then taking that information and then shaping it with enough of an evidence base is, in my mind, critical to the success of an entry. The writing style then needs to be engaging and compelling in order to cut through the competition.
So it is worthwhile? Yes, absolutely. But, if you’re unsure about gaps in the skill base in-house, you should definitely have a think about pulling in external expertise, to give you the best chance of success!

Everything we do is constructive
Realia marketing / Brick Development Association

Creative Director: Paul Newbold, Realia Marketing

Stop me if you’ve heard this one… A creative brief walks into a bar. “Hi, I’m a brick. Make me look sexy!” Sexy?! How the hell do you make a brick look sexy? So the challenge was on. I believe a brick can be many things. Sturdy, strong, resilient, um… rectangular? Did I mention strong? But sexy was always going to be an interesting task.
The idea of the campaign was to give inspiration to the world of brick and to have the guys in the business of building (you know, architects, specifiers and builders), embrace the passion to create beautiful buildings using brick that will landmark the horizon for years to come. The visual depicted iconic London buildings – that champion this often unsung hero in building materials – carved out of brick and engulfed with dark moody lighting …
So, did we make the brick look sexy? Well, our award nomination speaks for itself, and other than dressing a brick up in a two piece bikini, I believe we succeeded. It’s a strong, yet elegantly simple campaign, that as far as I’m concerned, reeks of sexiness.

Poetry in Motion
‘Poetiquette’ campaign – Transport for London – M&C Saatchi

PR Account Director: Jenny Granger, Realia Marketing

Ahemm. Whoever thought public safety communications were, well, dull and boring, kindly think again, please.

The success of Transport for London’s ‘poetiquette’ campaign crafted by M&C Saatchi, first launched in October 2013, thankfully continued into 2014. The series of art-led posters by renowned graphic artist and illustrator, Mcbess, has quietly refreshed the interiors of London’s tubes, in a bid to tackle safety issues and anti-social behaviour that cause the delays and general hassle that we all loathe.

With accompanying messaging fashioned into poems that humorously address travel etiquette; the gentle, retro-slanted styling of the ink-toned illustrations and quirky, wry tone of the ‘poems’, is pure charm. This direction cleverly sets the posters apart from other advertising ‘noise’ in the carriage. If you don’t think it’s complete madness to attempt a few moments of peaceful contemplation on the tube – these posters intelligently reach out to that special quiet zone. Conclusion: You don’t always have to ‘shout’ to be heard. Lovely!

Mo-sista! Women don’t miss out on ‘ Moustachery’
Proctor & Gamble, Aussie Hair

Junior Art Director: Rachel Hancock, Realia Marketing

Along with kicking back on the sofa with a nice mug of coco to enjoy the early Christmas advertising schedule, another early winter tradition has now captured the imagination of men with a penchant for experimenting with facial hair. ‘Movember’ (No-shave November), is now no more than just an excuse to grow a fine piece of moustachery; it’s about having conversations while raising funds and awareness… having fun and doing good to change the face of men’s health, specifically prostate cancer, testicular cancer and mental health…” (Movember.com, 2014).

But what about the ladies?

This year the Proctor & Gamble hair brand Aussie, ingeniously decided to team up with ‘Movember’ with a campaign to help women get involved with spreading the same message. Their “Mo sista” campaign, invited women from all around the globe to show off their #misstache. This clever campaign not only presented Aussie with a brilliant corporate responsibility opportunity, but as the excitement, togetherness and creativity of the community grew, women were naturally also concerned about showing off their luscious locks. Quirky, mixed messaging at its finest! Love it!

The dinosaur in the room does good IBM’s Mainframe 50 Campaign, Centreline Digital

SEO Director: Luke Redding, Reddico

You can imagine the possible banter in the IBM boardroom during the planning meetings for their 50th anniversary marketing activity. Astute thinking quickly led them to the conclusion that a 50th anniversary celebration had to deliver something different, if it was to grab any attention at all worthwhile. It was time to dust that dinosaur down. Centreline Digital’s Mainframe50 Campaign seized on the opportunity to shift the perception of mainframe; to bring it back to life,
back into the public eye to give it new contemporary meaning.

How?

IBM created different personas and chose different content pieces, messages and delivery methods in order to influence perceptions:• ‘Engines of progress’ – aiming to shape c-level perception – video content highlighting and celebrating everyday contemporary business use of the mainframe.
• Ziq animations – used to showcase the mainframe’s role in keeping date secure.
• Master the mainframe – to encourage global computer science education.
• Created a tumblr page – used as an aggregator of brand new content.
• Created an anniversary website – a narrative piece for the celebration.

Results:

57,000 press mentions
98.9 million Twitter impressions
14,000 visits to the livestream event
Post campaign feedback suggested an overwhelming success in altering the perception – a transformative effect that gave it value to modern day business.

Wearing Pants; it’s a habit
Campaign for Realia client, Polygon – The Red Pants internal communications campaign

Client Services Director: Nicola Williamson, Realia Marketing

You can imagine the possible banter in the IBM boardroom during the planning meetings for their 50th anniversary marketing activity. Astute thinking quickly led them to the conclusion that a 50th anniversary celebration had to deliver something different, if it was to grab any attention at all worthwhile. It was time to dust that dinosaur down. Centreline Digital’s Mainframe50 Campaign seized on the opportunity to shift the perception of mainframe; to bring it back to life,
back into the public eye to give it new contemporary meaning.

Having worked closely together to create the ‘ Red Pants’ solution we value Realia’s bravery, creativity and agility. The registrations campaign was of vital importance to our business and the results so far have been staggering”.

Thomas Espolin-Kahrs, Regional Manager for Polygon Norway.


The background

In 2013 Polygon Norway lost millions of NOK in possible revenue as a result of its field based technicians failing to bill for disposable items and buying fuel when it was most expensive. In addition, it was suffering from one of the lowest levels of employee satisfaction in the group. Often feeling isolated, technicians felt they were being emailed too much – with too much English business jargon. We had to do something different to halt the decline in revenues and satisfaction – we had to take risks.

The results

‘Pants’ was different to anything Polygon had seen before, so it was a big risk for the client to take. It had an immediate impact in terms of awareness of the issue and, critically on revenues; in just three months gross revenues per technician increased by 38%, whilst at the same time the costs associated with vehicles reduced by 60%.There has been a dramatic impact on Employee Satisfaction too – improving from 68 points to 85 points.